Text Processing Book: Natural Language Processing with Python 1st Edition

Natural Language Processing with Python

Description
Analyzing Text with the Natural Language Toolkit

This book offers a highly accessible introduction to natural language processing, the field that supports a variety of language technologies, from predictive text and email filtering to automatic summarization and translation. With it, you’ll learn how to write Python programs that work with large collections of unstructured text. You’ll access richly annotated datasets using a comprehensive range of linguistic data structures, and you’ll understand the main algorithms for analyzing the content and structure of written communication.

Packed with examples and exercises, Natural Language Processing with Python will help you:

Extract information from unstructured text, either to guess the topic or identify “named entities”
Analyze linguistic structure in text, including parsing and semantic analysis
Access popular linguistic databases, including WordNet and treebanks
Integrate techniques drawn from fields as diverse as linguistics and artificial intelligence

This book will help you gain practical skills in natural language processing using the Python programming language and the Natural Language Toolkit (NLTK) open source library. If you’re interested in developing web applications, analyzing multilingual news sources, or documenting endangered languages — or if you’re simply curious to have a programmer’s perspective on how human language works — you’ll find Natural Language Processing with Python both fascinating and immensely useful.

About the Author
Steven Bird is Associate Professor in the Department of Computer Science and Software Engineering at the University of Melbourne, and Senior Research Associate in the Linguistic Data Consortium at the University of Pennsylvania. He completed a PhD on computational phonology at the University of Edinburgh in 1990, supervised by Ewan Klein. He later moved to Cameroon to conduct linguistic fieldwork on the Grassfields Bantu languages under the auspices of the Summer Institute of Linguistics. More recently, he spent several years as Associate Director of the Linguistic Data Consortium where he led an R&D team to create models and tools for large databases of annotated text. At Melbourne University, he established a language technology research group and has taught at all levels of the undergraduate computer science curriculum. In 2009, Steven is President of the Association for Computational Linguistics.

Ewan Klein is Professor of Language Technology in the School of Informatics at the University of Edinburgh. He completed a PhD on formal semantics at the University of Cambridge in 1978. After some years working at the Universities of Sussex and Newcastle upon Tyne, Ewan took up a teaching position at Edinburgh. He was involved in the establishment of Edinburgh’s Language Technology Group in 1993, and has been closely associated with it ever since. From 2000-2002, he took leave from the University to act as Research Manager for the Edinburgh-based Natural Language Research Group of Edify Corporation, Santa Clara, and was responsible for spoken dialogue processing. Ewan is a past President of the European Chapter of the Association for Computational Linguistics and was a founding member and Coordinator of the European Network of Excellence in Human Language Technologies (ELSNET).

Edward Loper has recently completed a PhD on machine learning for natural language processing at the the University of Pennsylvania. Edward was a student in Steven’s graduate course on computational linguistics in the fall of 2000, and went on to be a TA and share in the development of NLTK. In addition to NLTK, he has helped develop two packages for documenting and testing Python software, epydoc, and doctest.

Open Source Text Processing Project: TextBlob

TextBlob: Simplified Text Processing

Project Website: http://textblob.readthedocs.org/en/dev/

Github Link: https://github.com/sloria/textblob

Description

TextBlob is a Python (2 and 3) library for processing textual data. It provides a simple API for diving into common natural language processing (NLP) tasks such as part-of-speech tagging, noun phrase extraction, sentiment analysis, classification, translation, and more.

**Features**
Noun phrase extraction
Part-of-speech tagging
Sentiment analysis
Classification (Naive Bayes, Decision Tree)
Language translation and detection powered by Google Translate
Tokenization (splitting text into words and sentences)
Word and phrase frequencies
Parsing
n-grams
Word inflection (pluralization and singularization) and lemmatization
Spelling correction
Add new models or languages through extensions
WordNet integration

Reference
Getting Started with TextBlob

Open Source Text Processing Project: spaCy

spaCy: BUILD TOMORROW’S LANGUAGE TECHNOLOGIES

Project Website: https://spacy.io/

Github Link: https://github.com/honnibal/spaCy

Description

spaCy is a library for industrial-strength natural language processing in Python and Cython. It features state-of-the-art speed and accuracy, a concise API, and great documentation. If you’re a small company doing NLP, we want spaCy to seem like a minor miracle.

Reference
Getting Started with spaCy

Open Source Text Processing Project: NLTK

NLTK: Natural Language Toolkit

Project Website: http://www.nltk.org/

Github Link: https://github.com/nltk https://github.com/nltk/nltk

Description

NLTK is a leading platform for building Python programs to work with human language data. It provides easy-to-use interfaces to over 50 corpora and lexical resources such as WordNet, along with a suite of text processing libraries for classification, tokenization, stemming, tagging, parsing, and semantic reasoning, wrappers for industrial-strength NLP libraries, and an active discussion forum.

Thanks to a hands-on guide introducing programming fundamentals alongside topics in computational linguistics, plus comprehensive API documentation, NLTK is suitable for linguists, engineers, students, educators, researchers, and industry users alike. NLTK is available for Windows, Mac OS X, and Linux. Best of all, NLTK is a free, open source, community-driven project.

NLTK has been called “a wonderful tool for teaching, and working in, computational linguistics using Python,” and “an amazing library to play with natural language.”

Natural Language Processing with Python provides a practical introduction to programming for language processing. Written by the creators of NLTK, it guides the reader through the fundamentals of writing Python programs, working with corpora, categorizing text, analyzing linguistic structure, and more. The book is being updated for Python 3 and NLTK 3. (The original Python 2 version is still available at http://nltk.org/book_1ed.)

Reference
Dive Into NLTK

Text Processing Book: Foundations of Statistical Natural Language Processing, 1st Edition

Foundations of Statistical Natural Language Processing

Description

Statistical approaches to processing natural language text have become dominant in recent years. This foundational text is the first comprehensive introduction to statistical natural language processing (NLP) to appear. The book contains all the theory and algorithms needed for building NLP tools. It provides broad but rigorous coverage of mathematical and linguistic foundations, as well as detailed discussion of statistical methods, allowing students and researchers to construct their own implementations. The book covers collocation finding, word sense disambiguation, probabilistic parsing, information retrieval, and other applications.

About the Author
Christopher Manning is a professor of computer science and linguistics at Stanford University. His Ph.D. is from Stanford in 1995, and he held faculty positions at Carnegie Mellon University and the University of Sydney before returning to Stanford. His research goal is computers that can intelligently process, understand, and generate human language material. Manning concentrates on machine learning approaches to computational linguistic problems, including syntactic parsing, computational semantics and pragmatics, textual inference, machine translation, and recursive deep learning for NLP. He is an ACM Fellow, a AAAI Fellow, and an ACL Fellow, and has coauthored leading textbooks on statistical natural language processing and information retrieval. He is a member of the Stanford NLP group (@stanfordnlp).

Text Processing Book: Speech and Language Processing, 2nd Edition

Speech and Language Processing, 2nd Edition

Description

For undergraduate or advanced undergraduate courses in Classical Natural Language Processing, Statistical Natural Language Processing, Speech Recognition, Computational Linguistics, and Human Language Processing.

An explosion of Web-based language techniques, merging of distinct fields, availability of phone-based dialogue systems, and much more make this an exciting time in speech and language processing. The first of its kind to thoroughly cover language technology – at all levels and with all modern technologies – this text takes an empirical approach to the subject, based on applying statistical and other machine-learning algorithms to large corporations. The authors cover areas that traditionally are taught in different courses, to describe a unified vision of speech and language processing. Emphasis is on practical applications and scientific evaluation. An accompanying Website contains teaching materials for instructors, with pointers to language processing resources on the Web. The Second Edition offers a significant amount of new and extended material.

About the Author
Dan Jurafsky is an associate professor in the Department of Linguistics, and by courtesy in Department of Computer Science, at Stanford University. Previously, he was on the faculty of the University of Colorado, Boulder, in the Linguistics and Computer Science departments and the Institute of Cognitive Science. He was born in Yonkers, New York, and received a B.A. in Linguistics in 1983 and a Ph.D. in Computer Science in 1992, both from the University of California at Berkeley. He received the National Science Foundation CAREER award in 1998 and the MacArthur Fellowship in 2002. He has published over 90 papers on a wide range of topics in speech and language processing.

James H. Martin is a professor in the Department of Computer Science and in the Department of Linguistics, and a fellow in the Institute of Cognitive Science at the University of Colorado at Boulder. He was born in New York City, received a B.S. in Comoputer Science from Columbia University in 1981 and a Ph.D. in Computer Science from the University of California at Berkeley in 1988. He has authored over 70 publications in computer science including the book A Computational Model of Metaphor Interpretation.