Text Processing Book: Speech and Language Processing (3rd ed. draft)

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Speech and Language Processing (3rd ed. draft)

Project Website: https://web.stanford.edu/~jurafsky/slp3/

Description

 

Chapter Slides Relation to 2nd ed.
1: Introduction [Ch. 1 in 2nd ed.]
2: Regular Expressions, Text Normalization, and Edit Distance Text [pptx] [pdf]
Edit Distance [pptx] [pdf]
[Ch. 2 and parts of Ch. 3 in 2nd ed.]
3: Finite State Transducers
4: N-Grams LM [pptx] [pdf] [Ch. 4 in 2nd ed.]
5: Neural Language Models and RNNs
6: Spelling Correction and the Noisy Channel Spelling [pptx] [pdf] [expanded from pieces in Ch. 5 in 2nd ed.]
7: Classification: Naive Bayes, Logistic Regression, Sentiment NB [pptx] [pdf]
Sentiment [pptx] [pdf]
[new in this edition]
8: Hidden Markov Models [Ch. 6 in 2nd ed.]
9: Part-of-Speech Tagging [Ch. 5 in 2nd ed.]
10: Formal Grammars of English
11: Syntactic Parsing
12: Statistical Parsing
13: Dependency Parsing
14: Language and Complexity
15: Vector Semantics Vector [pptx] [pdf] [expanded from parts of Ch. 19 and 20 in 2nd ed.]
16: Semantics with Dense Vectors Dense Vector [pptx] [pdf] [new in this edition]
18: Computing with Word Senses: WSD and WordNet Intro, Sim [pptx] [pdf]
WSD [pptx] [pdf]
[expanded from parts of Ch. 19 and 20 in 2nd ed.]
21: Lexicons for Sentiment and Affect Extraction SentLex [pptx] [pdf] [new in this edition]
16: The Representation of Sentence Meaning
17: Computational Semantics
??: Neural Models of Sentence Meaning (LSTM, CNN, etc.)
20: Information Extraction [Ch. 22 in 2nd ed.]
22: Semantic Role Labeling and Argument Structure SRL [pptx] [pdf]
Select [pptx] [pdf]
[expanded from parts of Ch. 19 and 20 in 2nd ed.]
23: Coreference Resolution and Entity Linking
24: Discourse Coherence
25: Summarization
26: Machine Translation
27: Question Answering
28: Conversational Agents
29: Speech Recognition
30: Speech Synthesis

About the Author
Dan Jurafsky is an associate professor in the Department of Linguistics, and by courtesy in Department of Computer Science, at Stanford University. Previously, he was on the faculty of the University of Colorado, Boulder, in the Linguistics and Computer Science departments and the Institute of Cognitive Science. He was born in Yonkers, New York, and received a B.A. in Linguistics in 1983 and a Ph.D. in Computer Science in 1992, both from the University of California at Berkeley. He received the National Science Foundation CAREER award in 1998 and the MacArthur Fellowship in 2002. He has published over 90 papers on a wide range of topics in speech and language processing.

James H. Martin is a professor in the Department of Computer Science and in the Department of Linguistics, and a fellow in the Institute of Cognitive Science at the University of Colorado at Boulder. He was born in New York City, received a B.S. in Comoputer Science from Columbia University in 1981 and a Ph.D. in Computer Science from the University of California at Berkeley in 1988. He has authored over 70 publications in computer science including the book A Computational Model of Metaphor Interpretation.


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